Category Archives: Product Reviews

How to attach a trout net to your fishing vest

Recently I purchased a trout net to use when I go fly fishing.    My former net worked well for some purposes, but for catch-and-release trout fishing, it was wasn’t so good.   It was rather bulky, was made of aluminum which made clanking noises from time to time, and it was not very gentle on the fish.  I ended up purchasing a Promar LN-208 Landing Net on Amazon. The next question was: how would I attach the net to my fishing vest? After trying unsuccessfully to use the supplied lanyard to attach it in a practical manner, I finally decided to go a different route and purchased a Magnetic Net Holder . I was little concerned about the magnet being strong enough, but once I actually attached my net with the device, I knew it would do the job. No amount of jumping up and down or moving about will cause the net to come loose. It is also strong enough that when you’re through using the net you simply put the handle behind your head and the magnet “finds” the other side and clips firmly into place. I’ve made a YouTube Video that demonstrates this process. I’ve also used the net in my first Fly Fishing Video as well.

One end of the net holder attaches with a split ring and the other end with a snap hook. The question is, which end goes where?  The product photo showed it with the snap hook attached to the vest.  That allows you to easily move the net to another garment without having to mess with detaching a split ring.  However, in my case I was more concerned with being able to switch to another net easily, so I put the snap hook on the net side and use the split ring to attach the holder to my vest.

Fishing Gear of 2015

I often get comments on my Youtube videos asking about my fishing gear. So I’ve decided to give you a run-down of the rods and reels in my arsenal this year.

I’ll start with a photo of them, and then fill you in on the details of each one.

rods and reels

From left to right:

1. Shakespeare Micro Underspin Rod and Reel Combo.  This is a great rod for the kids, but I enjoy using it as well.  The underspin reel is like a spincast reel but has a lever instead of a button. This makes it work more similar to a spinning reel than a spincast. The 4′ 6″ ultra-light rod is great for battling even the smallest of fish.

2. This is an aging ultra-light rod (not sure of the make and model at the moment, although I might give it a closer inspection later) with a Zebco 202 spincast reel. It seems that Zebco used the 202 model number on a wide variety of reels. Some of those were very low quality, others were not so bad. This reel is in the not-so-bad category. It has a smooth drag and casts great.

3. This is a Shakespeare Contender spinning reel on a Shakespeare Excursion spinning rod. The reel had been part of a combo but the rod fell victim to a car door and had to be replaced. For small fish, this is my favorite rig. I spool it with 4 lb test monofilament line and it allows long, smooth casts. It’s pure joy to use.

4. This spinning rod is a hand-me-down rod from my older brother. It is about 7 feet in length but was longer before it also feel victim to a car door. I added a new tip and it still works great even if the tip is a bit stiffer than it should be. The reel is a Quantum Optix size 20 spinning reel.

5. This is a Zebco 7-foot Hawg Seeker Spinning Combo that a buddy of mine picked up for me at a garage sale. My son Landry uses this rig when we are targeting catfish.

6. This rod is a 7-foot Zebco Catfish Fighter. I’ve had it for several years and am very pleased. It is not an expensive rod, but it seems to be great quality for the price. The reel is an old Shakespeare that came from a Shakespeare/Ugly Stick combo. I managed to break the original rod pulling it off a snag, so I replaced it with the Catfish Fighter.

7. Last, but not least, is my 9-foot Zebco Catfish Fighter with a Okuma Avenger ABF 50 Bait Feeder Reel. This is my best catfish rig. The extra length adds 30 to 50 feet of distance to my casts vs the 7-foot version. I’d like to say I’ve battled lots of 30-pound flathead catfish with this rig, but I cannot. The largest I’ve caught to date with it is 10 pounds. This summer seems like the perfect time to change that. 🙂

Crosman 760 Pumpmaster BB gun

Landry holding Crosman 760 BB gun

Landry holding his Crosman 760 BB gun

Today my seven-year-old son Landry unwrapped his first real gun – a Crosman 760 Pumpmaster BB/Pellet gun.  It looks a lot like the one I had when I was young, with a few differences.  First it is all black, instead of the wood-grain look of the one I had.  Also, it comes with a scope which can be mounted and used instead of the iron sights.  I didn’t know which was the best for learning to shoot, but since he was having some trouble understanding how to line up the iron sights, I decided to start with a scope.  After a short time getting it sighted in, it seems to do the job well.

The gun seems pretty sturdy.  It’s made out of plastic but has a solid feel unlike some of the BB guns I’ve used in the past.  I did have a problem with the stock becoming loose after a short time of using the gun, but a large Phillips-head screw on the bottom of the stock lets you tighten that up if needed.  It’s been a few weeks since I did that and it hasn’t come loose again. Landry is enjoying it and has become pretty accurate, hitting a pop can from across the large room in our basement every time.  Click on the video to see the gun in action.